Russian state media claim AP skews Putin coverage

Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in a televised call-in show with the nation in Moscow, Thursday, April 17, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Thursday rejected claims that Russian special forces are fomenting unrest in eastern Ukraine, but recognized for the first time that the troops in unmarked uniforms who had overtaken Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula before its annexation by Moscow were Russian soldiers. (AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Alexei Nikolsky, Presidential Press Service)MOSCOW (AP) — Kremlin-controlled television channels criticized The Associated Press' international television service for cutting into its live feed of President Vladimir Putin's nearly four-hour call-in show to send footage from other developing news stories, including the attempted raid on a Ukrainian national guard base.



Thugs with machetes attack Nigerian party congress

KADUNA, Nigeria (AP) — Nigerian officials say machete-wielding thugs have attacked delegates at a meeting of Nigeria's main opposition coalition, wounding scores in the northern city of Kaduna.
Four-way talks call for end to Ukraine violence

Pro-Russian protester seats at barricades at the police headquarters in SlavianskBy Arshad Mohammed and Alexei Anishchuk GENEVA/MOSCOW (Reuters) - The United States, Russia, Ukraine and European Union together called on Thursday for an immediate halt to violence in Ukraine, where Western powers believe Russia is fomenting a pro-Russian separatist movement. Washington immediately warned Moscow that it would face further sanctions if it did not carry out the agreement, reached in four-party crisis talks in Geneva. Russian President Vladimir Putin, speaking in Moscow, accused Ukraine's leaders of committing a "grave crime" by using the army to try to quell unrest in the east of the country, and did not rule out sending in Russian troops.



Guantanamo trial in 9/11 veers off track again

In this pool photo of a Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, defendants speak with their defense lawyers during a break in pretrial hearings at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base in Cuba, Monday, April 14, 2014. From right to left are Mustafa al Hawsawi, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali, Ramzi bin al Shibh, and Khalid Sheikh Mohammad sitting on the floor with Walid bin Attash sitting on a chair. A lawyer for one of five defendants in the Sept. 11 war crimes tribunal said Monday that FBI agents questioned a member of his defense team, apparently in an investigation related to the handling of evidence, a revelation that brought an abrupt halt to proceedings. (AP Photo/Janet Hamlin, Pool)GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba (AP) — An effort to prosecute the self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack and four co-defendants veered off track again Thursday as a pretrial hearing ended with new obstacles that threaten to further derail the case before a military tribunal at Guantanamo Bay.



Budget office: Wage boost would cost firms $15B

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate Democratic bill gradually increasing the federal minimum wage to $10.10 hourly would require private businesses to spend $15 billion more in salaries when it takes full effect in 2017, the Congressional Budget Office estimated Thursday.


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